Start Submission

Reading: Do External Rewards Depress Social Identification Motives to Vote?

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Research

Do External Rewards Depress Social Identification Motives to Vote?

Author:

Anita Braga

Durham University , GB
X close

Abstract

Can turnout be stimulated by monetary rewards to voters? Drawing on the literature on social identification motives for voting, this paper argues that for those that vote to gain benefits for their in-group, a financial reward on voting would depress turnout. It would increase ones’ own gains of voting at the expenses of the group’s ones. I take advantage of data on membership in a religious community or a political party as a proxy of social identification and combine it with the 2011 CCES survey results on the likelihood that these groups’ members will turn up on Election Day if rewards on voting were to be introduced. My results confirm the hypothesis that for strong group identifiers turnout rates are greatly depressed by the introduction of a reward on voting. However, depending on the strength of social identification there is a threshold above which rewards are high enough to make up for the lost internal motivation. These results suggest that a financial reward on voting might drastically change the composition of those involved in a country’s political and social life. Furthermore, rewards on voting could make voters too dependent on external incentives as a motivation to vote.
How to Cite: Braga, A., 2020. Do External Rewards Depress Social Identification Motives to Vote?. LSE Undergraduate Political Review, 3(1).
Published on 19 Jun 2020.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)