Start Submission

Reading: Cross-Class Coalition as a Force in Revolution: A Case Study of Tunisia's Arab Spring

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Research

Cross-Class Coalition as a Force in Revolution: A Case Study of Tunisia's Arab Spring

Author:

Claudia Stephens

American University, US
X close

Abstract

This article considers the causal mechanisms which allowed the Tunisian Jasmine Revolution, a movement which was the catalyst of the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings, were able to create transformative change and to overthrow former Tunisian President Ben Ali. It explores the relationships between class, urban citizenship, and protest, especially regarding the differences between middle and lower class movements. Further, it scrutinizes the less studied effects of movements collaboratively involving multiple classes – referred to as ‘cross-class coalitions’ – through analyzing the presence of differing protest strategies and demands, which, by drawing on prior scholarship, are used to represent the involvement of lower and middle class groups in this case study. Through its analysis, using the guidelines of case-centric process tracing, it concludes that a cross-class coalition cannot be determined as a causal factor through the presence of differing protest strategies, but it is confirmed as a causal mechanism through the initial presence of different protest demands and later consolidation of these demands. In making these conclusions, this article contributes to critical urban geography discussion of class, citizenship, and protest, in evaluating the involvement of multiple classes in a revolution as allies rather than individuals.
How to Cite: Stephens, C., 2022. Cross-Class Coalition as a Force in Revolution: A Case Study of Tunisia's Arab Spring . LSE Undergraduate Political Review, 5(1), pp.94–116.
Published on 02 Feb 2022.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)